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Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht

How odd — it looks like this has been dubbed into German? There’s no English soundtrack in this .mkv, but the lips definitely don’t match up to what they’re saying…

Oh!

There are two different versions of the film, one in which the actors speak English, and one in which they speak German.

Hm… Oh! There’s another file here — where they speak English, but otherwise identical? The lips match up a lot better here.

It still seems like it was filmed without audio and the voices were looped in, but it’s less strange in the English version.

Yeah, that’s a Herzog shot.

Anyway, this is the most “traditional” Herzog movie I can remember watching? That is, this could have been basically any Italian/German/Soviet copro-duction from around this time?

But I mean, only good.

Klaus! Finally!

It’s so cosy.

Oh, wow, now it’s not a run-of-the-mill movie any more.

Once Klaus is here, it’s all suddenly fascinating. I love how he plays Dracula as both terrifying and pathetic at the same time.

I love this! I haven’t seen the Murnau since like the 90s, so I don’t remember it in detail. But is this a scene-by-scene remake or something? So many of the shots look familiar, but I haven’t seen this movie before.

Wikipedia says I’m not insane:

Several shots in the movie are faithful recreations of iconic images from Murnau’s original film, some almost perfectly identical to their counterparts, intended as homages to Murnau.[

Man, that’s a lot of rats. If there’s “No Rats Were Hurt During The Making Of This Movie”, I don’t believe it.

Nosferatu. Werner Herzog. 1979.

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